Fox Lake IL Gaming Laws

As early as 2009, 3 years before Fox Lake adopted the 230 ILCS 40 (code for the new video gaming laws), Ed Bender, the then Fox Lake Mayor had seen both sides of the coin regarding the video gaming act. If enacted, he said it might bring the town a bad reputation but at the same time, perhaps it would also attract video gaming enthusiasts from neighboring towns and states where video gambling was illegal. Today, seven years later, video gambling has done more good than harm for Fox Lake and its community. And true to his words, many businesses have sprung up back to their feet. Business data shows that the enactment of this legislation has been good for the whole of Illinois and more local governments are adopting this new law.

By 2012, Fox Lake was waiting for the Illinois Gaming Board to finalize its regulations for the state-run video gaming network so that qualifying business people in the village could apply for their video gaming licenses. Thus, Fox Lake is one of the towns in Illinois that adopted the new video gaming regulations as soon as the law was enacted. How has this affected business in Fox Lake? Many proprietors say they have benefited greatly as we will see later in this article.

At the time, many people thought it was good news – they were right

In 2008, the Illinois smoking ban had gone into effect and it had affected many businesses, with some tavern owners reporting up to 30% less business. However, there was a silver lining in the cloud with the enactment of the 230 ILCS 40 because it would bring back business and compensate the owners for the business they had lost since the smoking ban went into effect.

In a board meeting involving business people and Fox Lake leaders, 10 business people asked the leaders to vote in favor of adopting the new video gaming laws.

But the laws were not accepted from the word go without opposition. Mike Behan, the then Police Chief for Fox Lake had written to the board showing his concerns about the intended adoption of the law. Among his concerns was that legalized video gambling would cause more alcoholism, financial problems in the local families and drunken driving. He was also fearing an increase in embezzlement and fraud cases but he did say that the police would consent to whatever the board voted for.

So, after the adoption of the new video gaming law of Illinois in 2012, has Chief Mike Behan been proved right or has the former mayor been vindicated by an increase in business? All of the evidence available points to the latter. You can confidently conclude that the Fox Lake adoption of the new Illinois video gambling laws was well advised and that it has brought more financial benefits than harm to the locals.

October 2012 to October 2013

The state of Illinois passed the law legalizing video gambling in 2009. Under the new law, fraternal organizations, truck stops, bars, veterans groups and restaurants could set up to 5 terminals in their establishments. They would however have to get a license for each terminal from the Illinois Gaming Board. From 2009, it took a further three years to streamline the regulation but when everything fell into place, Fox Lake was one of the first places to get on the state-run video gaming network, in 2012.

In the first year of approving video gambling licenses in the suburb, the city officials had only budgeted for $12,000 but to their pleasant surprise, the amount of money that video gaming raked in for them was many times more than that, at a handsome $93,338. This revenue was used for funding the Pace Bus program and since then, video gaming revenue has been directed to huge improvements in the village. For a small place like Fox Lake to earn more than $90K in the first year of operation, it shows that there is a lot of potential in video gambling and that is what prompted the licensing authorities to license more establishments to host video gaming terminals.

Fox Lake establishments that have video gaming terminals

Many businesses have enjoyed the benefits of legalized video gambling. One of these businesses is Stella’s Place that offers restaurant services as well as video gaming services. But it is the gaming experience that you will get there that is so outstanding, with more than 40 of video poker games and slots. The beautiful ambience and the good food add to the warmth of the place, attracting more diners and gamers.

It is open every day from 8.00Am to 2.00AM and while it has many items on the menu, gaming is the main course. It is the ideal entertainment place for grownups who want to have a video poker experience to try their luck.

J’s Sports Bar and Grill in Fox Lake has also been a big beneficiary from the proceeds raked in from video gaming. The owner of this establishment once said that video gaming saved the business from closing. Video gaming with voucher payments is now one of the biggest attractions on the J’s Sports Bar menu.

Fox Lake Country Club has 5 gaming terminals, the maximum number that is allowed by the law. The total amount won here is $8,421,675.44 so far. This establishment offers an 18-hole golf course and because it is open to the public, it is a very popular venue for summer vacations and video gaming.

Hidden Point Bar & Grill offers video poker from its three video gambling terminals. This is in accompaniment to some of the tastiest Mexican pork tacos that you will ever taste in the world. The total amount of money won at these three terminals comes up to more than $1.5 million.

Conclusion

There is no doubt that the 2012 decision to allow Fox Lake to get on the state-run video gaming network was a good decision for all parties involved. Business has grown exponentially with some proprietors saying that having video gaming terminals in their establishments saved them from closing down. The local and state governments have also benefitted by getting more revenue to run community programs for the benefit of their citizens. With legalized video gambling in the state of Illinois, more income and better business opportunities have been generated.

Red Or Black? Let Me See

The Rat Pack did it with style and grace. The suave sophistication of Sinatra, Martin and Davis Junior remain memorable visions for those who cheered them on during their ambitious heist in Vegas.

Smart stuff for the silver screen it may have been, but the modern day gambler has become highly sophisticated and mere shuffles or slights of the hand are simply old rope. No longer is Vegas the venue for fantasy cheating or shifty card play, the UK is awash with high rollers with a far more sinister methods of cleaning up the house. Card Counting is mere child’s play.

Recently, a ring of gamblers were convicted for running well drilled scams which resulted in cheating casinos and bookmakers of millions of pounds.

Gang members worked as a team to distract croupiers and security staff as they stole gaming chips worth thousands of pounds. A spill of drink on the table, a sudden cough or a sweaty palm have been enough to escape even the hawking eyes of ceiling security.

The inquiry, codenamed Suresh, began in January and investigators believe the ring may have been operating for several years. The gang is alleged to have used a similar ruse at betting shops to take money from cashiers.

Detective Inspector John Anderson, of the Metropolitan Police’s clubs and vice unit, said the investigation was the first to include Gambling Commission investigators.

“This gang has been repeatedly committing acts of fraud to gain entry to gaming establishments with the aim of cheating,” he said.”Through working collectively together in this way we can form a more effective response to combat organised gaming fraud.”

However, this was simply a basic hustle. There have been more ruthless methods. A casino cheat used hi-tech spy equipment to win up to 250,000 pounds from a West End casino was jailed for nine months while his accomplices received suspended sentences.

Others have been convicted following use of “up the sleeve” cameras and virtually invisible earpieces.

Hundreds of the roulette-cheating machines – which consist of a small digital time recorder, a concealed computer and a hidden earpiece – were tested at a government laboratory in 2004 after a gang suspected of using them won 1.3m pounds at the Ritz casino in London.

After the research, which was never made public but has been seen by the Guardian newspaper, the government’s gambling watchdog admitted to industry insiders that the technology can offer punters an edge when playing roulette in a casino, and the advantage can be “considerable”.

But rather than ban the devices, which are outlawed in many jurisdictions across the world, the Gambling Commission will require casinos to police themselves. Phill Brear, the commission’s director of operations, admits predictive softwares can work but suggested it might be possible to prosecute someone using them under a new Gambling Act offence of cheating.

However Mark Griffiths, Europe’s only professor of gambling, said using computer devices would not constitute cheating.”If someone’s got a piece of equipment that calculates where a ball will land, then that is akin to card counting in blackjack. It’s not cheating – it’s using science to give yourself a better advantage.”

The equipment consists of a clicker that records the deceleration speed of the rotor and ball, a remote computer device concealed inside a mobile phone or MP3 player, and an earpiece that instructs a player which zone the ball will land in.

The defense is used by Counsel when confronted with trials of this nature. Gaming devices which simply give a gambler an advantage may well be a legal tool in the same way that a sharp brain which can card count cannot be said to be a device for ‘cheating’

The Gaming Commission wrote last year stating: “We now agree that roulette wheels can develop a bias of the type you describe and that, particularly with the use of electronic equipment, players can use the bias to predict with some accuracy the segment of the wheel in which the ball will come to rest, thereby giving them an advantage.”

The dangers of such an admission are clear. Punters who have missed their numbers through innocent number selection will no doubt be furious that a device has cleared their pockets.

The Gaming Industry may now have left a easily accessible defense to a charge of cheating.

As Sinatra once famously quipped “Luck is only important insofar as getting the chance to sell yourself at the right moment. After that, you’ve got to have talent and know how to use it.

The History of Bookmakers

The origins of bookmaking have vanished into the past, but betting, especially on horse racing, has been ingrained in the character of England for centuries. Originally betting would have been between individuals, with the largest sums of money wagered on the Classic races, such as the Derby and the St Leger. Betting was the domain of the wealthy, but betting contracts, where no money changed hands, often led to large debts and animosity. The Gaming Act of 1845 banned this practice and bookmakers began to insist on cash up front.

Betting shops started being set up around the country but were outlawed by the 1853 Betting Act, and were not legalised until 1 May 1961, after which 10,000 were set up within 6 months, with some of the illegal bookies making it through the new vetting procedures, established by the 1960 Betting and Gaming Act. However a lot of them found that entering into the business world was outside of their capability, being unable to set up premises, pay staff and ‘go straight.’ As well as this, betting tax was increased and the Government imposed a 33 per cent tax on the fixed-odds coupons issued by bookmakers. The number of High Street shops began to decline, and now there are just over 8,000.

Punters could listen only to an audio commentary on races in the betting shops, provided by the Exchange Telegraph Company, with each region having a ‘local’ commentator with a ‘local’ accent. In 1986 the regulation relaxed and television screens were permitted which would bring live racing via satellite to the majority of shops. Bookmakers were permitted to open in the evenings and on Sundays, but duty at 10 per cent was driving punters to illegal bookmakers, who, operating in pubs, clubs and factories, accounted for a 10 per cent of betting turnover.

Another two events have had a massive impact on bookmakers – the first when Frankie Dettori rode all seven winners at Ascot in 1996, which resulted in massive payouts. The second was the introduction of the National Lottery and particularly scratchcards in 1995, with the betting shops being denied the right to sell tickets. A Government survey on gambling revealed that 57% of gamblers use the lottery, 20% buy scratchcards and 17% bet on horseracing.

However in the past decade, measures have been taken to rebalance the nation’s gambling impulses. Tax on betting-shop wagers was cut from 10% to 9% and abolished in 2002, in favour of a tax on the bookies’ gross profits. Rules regarding betting on football were relaxed, allowing bets on single matches, and betting shops have been allowed to install fixed-odds betting terminals and fruit machines.

Online gambling is today’s worry on bookmakers but the figures suggest that the world of internet gambling and betting shops could live side by side -the four biggest betting shop companies still seem strongly committed to betting shops. William Hill currently runs more than 2,250 shops; Ladbrokes has 2,350; Coral owns 1,600; and totesport manages 540. Paddy Power, which has 58 British shops, mostly in and around London, announced profits of £55.2m for 2007, half of this coming from online operations. But its UK shops also made money and it plans to have twice as many by 2011.

How Do I Set Up a Casino in the UK?

Anyone who wishes to provide facilities for gambling, or to manufacture supply, install, repair or adapt a gaming machine or gambling software is required to hold a licence authorising the specific activity to be undertaken.” Gambling Act 2005

If you wish to provide facilities for gaming in the UK you will require a licence. There are three categories of licence (operating, personal and premises) – your business may need all three kinds. Operating licences and personal licences, are issued by the Gambling Commission and premises licences are issued by your local authority.

What are the licences?

Operating Licenses – if you wish to provide facilities for gambling you will require an operating licence.

Personal Licenses

There are two types of personal licences:

· Personal Management Licence – required by all persons who occupy a specified management position.

· Personal Functional Licence – required by those individuals who work within a casino at staff level e.g. a dealer, cashier, pit boss etc

To apply for a licence you should visit the The Gambling Commission’s website at www.gamblingcommission.gov.uk [http://www.gamblingcommission.gov.uk]

What are the costs?

There are two types of fee payable for operating licences – a one off application fee and an annual fee payable within 30 days of your licence being issued:

1. Application Fee for a new casino up to £40,000

2. Annual Fee for a new casino up to £102,000

There are two types of fee payable for personal licences:

1. Personal Management Licence £330

2. Personal Functional Licence £165

When should I apply for my licence?

You should aim to submit your application as soon as possible, and you cannot start running your gambling business until you have obtained all the relevant permissions.